Tuesday, November 6, 2012

It is still early, but what questions do you-all have that you would like me to address?

8 comments:

  1. It looks like this year, just like in 2000, we may see a President elected via the electoral college who did not win the majority of the popular vote. How likely is this, and what might the implications be for the newly elected President? Will they still have a clear mandate?

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    1. Here you are Mr. Thomas - a great example of trying to predict when the math is just too darn close!

      http://www.askapoliticalscientist.com/2012/11/mr-thomas-question.html

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  2. Good morning,
    I would like to know what is the real room of manoeuvre for the new President against chinese policies.
    Both of them what sanctions against China for "unfair" competition (currency manipulator and universal principles of intellectual property violator) but what kind of measures can be taken against the country which provides you capital and which is one your best business partner ?

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    1. Ms Menez, I hope this answers your question!

      http://www.askapoliticalscientist.com/2012/11/ms-menezs-question-what-tools-does-us.html

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  3. does the disparity of spending in swing states vs non-swing by all parties involved highlight the shortcomings of the electoral college system in ensuring that the system equally values (in monitary and public policy terms) each citizen regardless of what state they happen to live in? If so, what's the benefit of this system that outweighs that shortcoming?

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    1. Hope this answers your question, good Doctor!


      http://www.askapoliticalscientist.com/2012/11/dr-rays-question-does-campaign-spending.html

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  4. Once elected the new President will have to work towards the United States' long term priorities like nuclear arms control and disarmament or the management of relations in both China and in Islamic states. Additionally the President will have to work with current issues as well as the 'surprises' that may come about with changes in other political states. For instance, there are leadership transitions occurring or will be soon in both North Korea and in Russia, both of which could affect the United States' relations with both. Most of the issues can be seen as policy issues, and should the President and Congress make efforts to work towards then it will eliminate or minimize some issues. Without knowing who will win the election, do you believe it is possible for the president to address more long term foreign policy issues? Or do you believe that the current issues or 'surprises' will required the full attention of the President? Will the United States be able to sustain its international power base in the next generation, should the long term issues not receive an adequate amount of attention? It is noted that three key components of national power are infrastructure, innovation, and education. Do you agree? And if so do you think the President and Congress will be able to make larger investments in them within the presidential term?

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    1. Here you go boss - don't hit me if it isn't enough!

      http://www.askapoliticalscientist.com/2012/11/ms-wilmers-questions-whence-united.html

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I appreciate your comments, questions, insights, debates, and so forth, but please, no trolling, flaming, hate, or general incivility.